Adding Static Analysis to Your C++ GitHub Repository

Static analysis can be extremely useful for monitoring the quality of your code base. These tools analyze your source code and check for certain kinds of mistakes that can be detected purely based on how the code is written. In this post, I’ll show you how you can add two free static analysis tools to a free continuous integration build for your C++ github repository.

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Utah Fall Code Camp 2011

The Utah Fall Code Camp 2011 is coming up and I’ve proposed a number of talks and volunteered to present some that didn’t yet have speakers. If any of these sessions sound interesting to you, please visit the Utah Code Camp web site and vote for them.

  • Open Source Development Track: Recursive Descent Parsers with Boost.Spirit
  • Microsoft Development Track: Powering Managed Applications with the GPU and SlimDX
  • Architecture Track: High Performance C++, or How to Make Friends With the Cache

The following talks already existed but had no speaker yet, so I volunteered to give them:

  • Mobile Development Track: Push Notifications and Tiles for Windows Phone
  • Mobile Development Track: Game Development for the Windows Phone 7.5

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Iterated Dynamics Moved From SourceForge To CodePlex

No SourceForgeOver the past few years, I’ve become increasingly disappointed with SourceForge for my open source projects. It used to be the first place I would suggest for hosting open source projects; now I would never recommend it. As a result, I’ve moved Iterated Dynamics to CodePlex.

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FractInt for Windows (beta 5)

Download FractInt for Windows Beta 5

The legacy code I’ve been working on lately is FractInt.  FractInt’s most recent release is a source base that compiles in three ways: DOS (FRACTINT), Win16 (WinFract) and lunix/X11 (xfractint).  The DOS code has gone about as far as any DOS program should go, and then some.  The Win16 and X11 code has lagged behind the DOS code in some areas, mostly because people didn’t want to translate the 16-bit x86 assembly code for other environments.

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